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Full text of "Foreign crops and markets"

Historic, archived document 



Do not assume content reflects current 
scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 



FOREIGN CROPS AND MARK 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE -- 

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS TJ. E-. Bepa^** 1 ' °^ ^ 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 




Vol. 36 



January 8, 1938 



No. 1 



LATE CABLES... 



India first estimate of the 1938 area sown to 

flaxseed placed at 2,948,000 acres against the revised w c* c3 

first estimate for 1937 of 2,759,000 acres and the fi- _ 52 «. 

c a w 

nal estimate of 3,594,000 acres. (Director of Statis- so so 

tics, Calcutta.) o^n 

Siam 1937 rice production placed at 4,792,717,000 
pounds of cleaned rice from 7,196,000 acres compared 
with 4,414,487,000 pounds from 5,525,000 acres in 1936. " o 

(International Institute of Agriculture, Rome.) !P £ 

O CO 

Germany 1937 sugar-beet production placed at ^ 
17,307,000 short tons compared with 13,333,000 tons fe '] 

in 1936. (International Institute of Agriculture, 0 n 

Rome. ) 

India first estimate of area sown to rapeseed 
and mustard for 1938 harvest placed at 3,053,000 acres 
compared with revised first estimate for 1937 of 
2,890,000 acres and final estimate of 5,771,000 acres. 
(International Institute of Agriculture, Rome.) 



2 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 1 



GRAINS 

The ori ental, wheaff situation 

Ch ina 

The sowing of winter wheat in China for harvest in 1938 was 
interrupted by hositilities in the lower Yangtze Valley and in North 
China, and the winter acreage in these areas may he reduced, it is re- 
ported by radio from the Shanghai office of the Bureau of Agricultural 
Economics. As a result s however , of favorable prices and encouragement 
by the Government, increases in other parts of China may tend to offset 
the decline. 

Trade in wheat continues at a standstill because of military 
activities disrupting transportation. Mills at Shanghai and Tientsin 
are able to operate at only a low percentage of their capacity, since 
they are unable to obtain wheat supplies. Chinese mills in other 
localities have suffered some damage from hostilities, but it is not 
considered serious. Domestic flour was quoted during the week ended 
December 24 at $1.31 per bag of 49 pounds. 

CHINA: Imports of wheat flour, November and July -Nov ember, 

1935-1937. 



Country 



United States 
Canada . . 
Australia 
Japan. . . . 
Others . . 

Total.. . 



November 



Barrels 

3,000 
10,000 
7,000 



21 , 000 



1937 



Ba rrels 

18,000 
4,000 

14, 000 
1,000 



37,000 



July-No vemb er 



1936 



Barrels 

14,300 
53,100 
50,300 

3 , 400 

700 



121,800 



1937 



Bar rels 

38,800 
24,500 
85,700 
/ 1,400 

600 



151,000 



Shanghai office, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. 

a/ Chinese customs returns do not include the large shipments of flour 
into North China made by Japan during recent months. 

J apan 



Prices of wheat and flour at Tokyo on December 1 were below those 
of a month earlier, according to information from Consul. General Cameron 
at Tokyo. Western White was the cheapest foreign wheat quoted, but 
prospects for purchases of United States wheat continued uncertain be- 
cause of exchange control. The domestic flour market was fair; mills 
were active, and both domestic and foreign deliveries were good. Wheat 
was quoted at the mill on December 1 as follows, import duty and landing 



r .. au.v.ry 3 , 1933 



Foreign Crcos and Markets 



3 



charges included: Western White -To. 2, Si. 42 per "bushel; Canadian No. 1, 
$1.35, No. 3, $1.53; Australian $1.45 per* bushel. Domestic Standard was 
31.28 per bushel, and Portland wheat, c.i.f. Yokohama, $1.06, duty and. 
landing charges excluded. The wholesale price of flour at the mill was 
SI. 35 per "bag of 49 pounds. 

Exports of flour from Japan during July-Cctcber 1937 totaled 
555,000 "barrels or over twice as much as was reported in the corre- 
sponding period of 1935. Shipments to Manchuria during the first 3 
months of the marketing season were somewhat smaller than in July- 
September 1935. The increase is largely accounted for by exports to 
North China. 



JAPAN: Imports of viicat by countries of origin and total exports 



of 


flour, October or 


d July-Octob 


er, 1935-1 


937 






"•ctober 




July-: 


ctober 


; 1935 


1937 


1935 




1937 




[1,000 bushels p., 


000 bushels 


1,000 bushels 


1, ] 0 bushels 


Imports of wheat 












United States. 


; so | 




90 






Carada 


J 309 j 


152 


1,534 




504 






24-7 : 


507 




734 






9 






73 




.; 178 




487 




4 


L'onchuria 




92 


127 




315 


0 - - -G' _ c •••••••• 


; 52 : 




'62 






ixoorts of flour 


533 " 


^00 


2,807 




1.530 


:i,000 barrels 1., 


000 barrels ; 


1,000 barr 


els 


1 ,06C barrels 


i 123 ■ 


257 


303' 




556 


Shanghai office, 


Bureau of Agricultural economics. 







Manchuria 



The 1937 wheat crop of Manchuria amounted to 39,645,000 bushels, 
according to the latest estimate, issued December 15, or aboat 13 per- 
cent larger than the 1935 harvest. Prospects for spring scedings indi- 
cate an increase in the 1933 acreage. Self-sufficiency in wheat is part 
of the Government's Five Year Plan, and some effort has been made to^ ex- 
pand the vheat acreage in North Ivlonchuria. The domestic production of 
flour still falls short of home requirements, but the flour milling in- 
dustry has been very active during the past season, and imports have 
been considerably reduced. It has been reported, also, that 1,000,000 
bags of. flour were recently sold to North China. 

Flour imports in 1937-38 are expected to be about the sane as in 
1936-37, vhen they amounted to 5,563,000 bags of 49 pounds, the smallest 



4 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 1 



total recorded in recent years. The Trade Control Law : , as recently 
passed by the Manchurian Government/ prohibits any imports- of flour into 
the country unless of Japanese origin. 

Manch uria n crop producti on e qual to last yea r 

Eased on conditions of November 1, production of most major crops 
in Manchuria is expected to equal last year's harvest, according to the 
third official estimate received from the Shanghai office of the Bureau 
of Agricultural Economics quoting American Consul Lamont at Harbin. 
Earlier estimates for the 1937 production placed the harvest of most 
crops this season about 10 percent above last year. Unfavorable weather, 
mainly excessive rainfall in South Manchuria, has resulted in a dovaiward 
revision of practically all crops. The wheat, corn, and rice crops are 
above last year, the soybean and millet crops are estimated at about the 
same as last year, while kaoliang and other cereal crops are somewhat be- 
low last season's production. 

MANCHURIA: Production of specified crops, 1936 and 1937 



Final estimate 
1936 



Third estimate 
1937 



152,375,000 
376,000 
140,521,000 
81,570,000 
35,237,000 
4,675,000 
656,000 
1,205,000 
50,000 
162,000 



153,330,000 
116,000 
140,433,000 
83,735, 000 
39,546,000 
4,517,000 
725,000 
1,146,000 
59,500 
136 , 000 



Commodit; 



Soybeans . . . 
Other beans 
Millet. 
Corn. . . 
Wheat . 
Kaoliang. 
Rice. . . 
Other cereals 
Kemp seeds . . . 
Perilla. 



Unit 



Bushel s 
Bushels 
Bushels 
Bushels 
Bushels 
Short tons 



Short 
Short 
Short 
Short 



tons 
tons 
tons 
tons 



FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AMD ' NUTS 

Export s of citrus frui t from Egypt increasing 

Exports of citrus fraits from Egypt have increased from practi- 
cally nothing in 1931 to about 170,000 boxes in 1936, according to the 
Weekly Fru.it Intelligence Notes of the Imperial Economic Committee, 
London. The bulk of the movement consists of oranges, mandarins, and 
sweet lemons, but smaller quantities of sour lemons and limes are also 
exported. The principal outlets are the Netherlands and the United 
Kingdom. 



January 8, 1938 



Foreign Cro"os and Markets 



Reduced Nethe rlands import m o nopoly fee g n pears effective earlier 

- The reduced monopoly fee of C.02 florin per kilo (0.5 cent per 
pound) on fresh pears imported into the Netherlands was advanced to 
January 1, 1938, or a month earlier than usual, according to a cable 
from the American legation at the Hague. In addition, there' is a duty 
of 12 percent ad valorem. The reduced monopoly foe ordinarily runs 
from February to June but in years of small crops it may begin earlier. 
The reduced rate applies to a quantity* of imports from the United States, 
not to exceed 2,300 metric tons (100,000 bushels). A monopoly fee of 
0.04 florin per kilo (1 cent per pound) is in effect in the other months 
of the year. 

LIVESTOCK, MEATS, AND WO OL 

Australian wool values tend lower 

Wool prices at the Sydney, Australia sales opening January 4 
were oar to 5 "oercent lower than at the close on December 16 of the 
previous series, according to cabled advices from Agricultural Attache 
C. C. Taylor at London. There a good selection of wool offered 

at the opening of the new series and good competition developed among 
continental and Yorkshire buyers. Japan gave the market limited support. 

Mid-December reports from Consul £-•-£• Evans at Bradford 
suggested greater confidence in raw wool values on the part of 3ritish 
manufacturers* With most primary markets reporting upward-moving 
prices during the first half of the month, many Bradford operators 
were reported believing that the low point for the current season had 
been passed. 

The more substantial buying interest which developed in the first 
half of December for tops and yarns compelled Bradford top makers to 
increase their purchases in Australia, Consul Evans reports. Yorkshire 
firms were interested chiefly in covering their over-sold top position, 
but it was understood that some of the largest importers were becoming 
interested in buying wool for stock. Such a movement would indicate a 
greater measure of confidence than was evident during the September- 
November period. 

The recent announcement of the selling brokers in Australia to 
extend the current season to June aas been followed by the statement 
that arrangements have been made for controlling current wool offer- 
ings in the Union of South Africa. The amount of wool to be offered 
at sales during 1938 will be limited, and the Government has under con- 
sideration a plan to finance farmers vho hold back their wool. The 
announcement was received in Bradford as a factor tending to protect 
the price position of raw wool. 



6 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol, 36, Ho. 1 

J3EMAHK: Production of specified crops, 1932-1937 



Year 


j Wheat 


j Bye 


; Barley 


Oats 


Potatoes 


j Sugar 
! beets 




1 AAA 

; 1 , 000 
: bushels 


1 AAA 

; 1,000 
' bushels 


1 , 000 
; "bushels 


; 1,000 

i bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


t 1,000 
: bushels 


1932 

1933.... 

193 4 

1935.... 
1936.... 

1937.... 


I 10,997 
; 11,54-3 
12,gl+7 

: 14,673 
; 11,267 

. 13,595 


: S,736 
S 9,899 
i 10,801 

: n,i77 
: 7.S42 
: 9,44s 


! 46,348 
I kh, 023 

43 , 8 9 9 
i 50,864 
: 41,256 
: 50,063 


72,707 
: 68,657 
i 68,018 
: 71,784 
i 57,6i6 
: 69,583 


47,855 
48,762 

; 50,447 

44,741 
i 47,344- 
\ 49,236 


i 1,579 

: 1,902 
■ 1,155 

; 2,079 

: 2,003 
: 2,1+117 


International Institute of Agri 


culture, Rome, 








ENGLAND AITD WALES: 


Production 


of grains, 


1932-1937 




Year 


Wheat 


; Barley 


i . Oat 


s 




1,000 bushels 


1,000 bushels 


1 UQQQ, "bushels 


1932.... 
1933 ..- 
1934.... 

1935.... 

1936 

1937.... 


i 41,253 

: 53,725 
: 65,259 
j 60,592 
: 51,445 
: 52,005 


i 35,79s 

: 29,U 5 6 

: 33,927 
': 30,613 
: 30.940 
: 26,880 


j 87,563 

85,820 
: 78,120 
: 79,66o 
: ■ 75,600 
• 65,660 


Agricultural Attache 


C . C . Tayl or, London . 










SCOTLAND: 


Area and p 


roduction 0 


f grains, 1932-1937 




Year 


Wheat 


Barley 


Oats 


Area ! 


Production 


Area : 


Production j 


Area : 


Production 




1 , 000 i 

acres ; 


1.000 ] 

bushels ; 


1 , 000 ; 

acre s j 


1 , 000 : 
bushel s. : 


1,000 j 


1,000 
bushels 


1932.... ! 

1933.... : 
1934.... : 

1935.... : 
1936.... : 

1937-... •' 


52 

73 : 
9s : 

101 : 

94 : 
100 : 


2,2l|0 ; 
3,472 ; 

4,144 s 
4, 4so : 

3,547 : 
4,181 : 


69 i 

60 : 
96 j 

77 ; 

72 : 
81 ; 


3,080 i 
2,660 i 
4,200 1 
3 , 547 i 
3 , 080 : 
3,687 j 


867 j 

856 : 
816 : 
827 : 
829 : 
819 


52,220 
48,580 

45,150 
47,670 

4U,9Uo 
46,620 



Agricultural Attache C. C. Taylor, London. 



January 8, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



I 



Closing Saturday prices of September futures 



Date 



Chicago Kansas City 



Minneapolis 



1216. 



hi gn c/ . 
Low c / . . 
Dec. 11. 
IS. 

25- 
31. 

a/ Conve: 
other pr: 
future s . 



•Cents 
•T42~ 

; 112 

' 12R 

: 132 

: lib 

: 135 



1 V 37 ; 19;6 1^7 



!ents :Cents 



109 

87 

52 

91 

92 

90 



130 
108 

119 

126 
130 
130 



1221 



Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


1 >T 


lhh 


nil 


83 


121 


93 


89 


133 


99 


38 


140 


99 


90 


144 


100 


87 


144 


98 



Winnipeg a/ 



19^6 



oent s 



129 
106 

117 

125 
129 
129 



1311 



Cents 
12b ' 
105 
115 
117 
118 
US 



Liverpool a 



Cents . Cent s 
130 
109 
113 
113 
111 
110 



133 
110 

123 
130 

129 

133 



Buenos 
Aireg b/ 



Cents 



d/101 
£/ 97 
3/ 93 
d/101 
d/ 99 
d/100 



sior.s at noon buying rate of exchange 
ces. cj October 1 to date, d/ March 



C ents 
e/l06 
ej 98 
d/102 

d/103 
d/102 
d/104 



, b/ Prices 
future s . e / 



are of day previous to 
February and March 



ffHEAT: Weekly weighted average cash price at stated markets 



DTI ^ p 


All classes 
and grades 
six markets 


no. 2 

I-Iard Winter .' 
Kansas City ! 


No. 1 
Dk.i:. Spring 
iinneapoli s 


No. 2 Hard 
Amber Durum 
Minneapolis 


No . 2 
P.ed Winter 
St. Louis 


Western 

White 
Seattle a/ 


1536" 1337 


1936 


1337 : 


193 fc, : i33y 


1336 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


191L- 


High b/ . . . 
Low b/ .... 
Dec. 11... 

IS . . . 

25... 

31... 


Cents -Cent s 


Cents 


Cents : 
111 ' 

92 ■ 
97 ; 
97 ; 

96 : 
96 :' 


Cents -Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


149 ; 110 
126 ' 91 

131 : 97 
142 : 96 
145 : 96 
149 : 96 


iW 

120 
130 

137 
141 
143 


17b i 133 

139 ; 109 

155 : 121 

162 ; 116 

163 : 122 
176 ' - 


183 

135 

183 
17S 
180 


110 

98 
. 109 

104 
103 
105 


~iW 
11s 

130 

137 

141 

143 


112 

8b 

95 
94 

95 
95 


115 

96 
108 

113 
114 

115 


95 
82 

86 

85 
86 



a/ Weekly average of daily cash quotations, basis 



ro . 1 



iked, b/ Oct. 1 to date 



Price per bushel at specified European markets, 1336-37 an< l 1937-38 



Year 
beginning 
July 



Rotterdam 



Ranse 



Hard 
Winter 
No. 2 



Manitoba 
No. 3 



Argentina Australia 



a/ 



Berlin 
c/ 



England 
and 
Wales 



Domestic 



1936- 37 d/... 

1937- 33 d/... 
Week ended 

Nov. 18.... 

25.... 
Dec. 2.... 

• • • • 

lb 

. J- - • • • • 



High 
Low 
High 
Low 



Centos 
e/ 127' 
e/ 101 
e' 148 
ej 117 
e/ 122 
e/ 121 

e/ 119 

e/ 122 
e/ 118 



Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


j Cents 




145 


125 


" 141 


: 233" 


117 


99 


99 


100 


: 209 


91 


160 


146 


149 


: 223 


132 


ro 

rH 


117 


117 


208 


113 


140 


121 


136 


: 219 


119 


134 


118 


133 


■ 21s 


11s 


134 


117 


124 


; 218 


117 


140 


120 


117 


222 


116 


143 


119 




222 


115 



Prices in England and Wales 
current exchange rates, a/ 
August 16, 193 k. d/ July 1 



are lor week 
Barusso. b/ 
to date, e/ 



ending : 

F.A.Q. 

Hominal 



laturday. Conversions made at 
c/ Producer's fixed price from 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



To: 



36, No. 1 



FEED GRAINS AND RYE: ' Tfeekly average price per bushel of corn, rye, 



Y/eek 
ended 



High, b / . . . . 



L OW Dj 



7 



Dec. 4. 
11. 
18. 

25. 
Ja n . 1 



ts, and oar ley at leacd. 
C r nrn 



g marks t s - a/ 
pvo" 



Oats 



Barley 





Chi 


2 ago , 




3^^S_^re_t 


i„ .Minneapolis Chicr 


igo ; 


Minnc ao o 1 is 


No. 

Yei: 


3 

.ow 


Future s 


Future's 


; NO 


. 2 


510. 3 
finite : 


No. 2 


1 936 




1936 


Ji9S7_. 


19361 1937 ; 


_123£" 


J_2.37__ 


i 9.36 id 


937 J 


X9.36 :193? . 


-Cenis 


J^eniis 


-CssAs 


Cents 


Cents 






Cents 


fleais- Cents: 


Gents ; Genid 


118 ' 


138 


105 


62 


51 


L 80 


117 


117 


; 53 i 


55 


133 : 137 


59 


53 


101 


56 - 
May_ 


46 
Dad. 


: 59 
• Deji." 


43 


67 


1 25 ■ 


30 


58 j 61 


105 


53 


101 


55 


47 


i 67 ' 


93 


67 


47 \ 


32 


128 j 69 


107 


, 56 


102 


58 


47 


: 70 


100 


: 70 


\ 50 j 


32 


129 i 72 


107 


58 


103 


59 


49 
&M9 
_cl/5Q_ 


: 73 


113 


i 70 


! 52 : 


32 


131 • 73 


108 
— 1 0,8 . 


53 


104 
.105- 


60 


: ' 76 
— 80 


115 
— il.7_ 


> 70 
—72- 


■ 52 ' 

: — 53^._ 


32 
— 33- 


127 •' 75 
130 77 



a/ Gash urices are weighted averages of reported sales; future prices 
averages of daily quotations, "of For period January 1 to latest date 
cj February delivery. 

PEED GRAINS: Movement from principal exporting countries 



are simple 
shown. 



Commodity 
and 
country 



Exports 
f .or.., yaar. 



Sh foments 1937-35, 
m&i£^lldjad_4^ 



1935-36; 1936-37 Dec 18; Dec. 25 Jan. 1 



, EXPORTS: 



BARLEY 

United States . . . . 

Canada 

Argentina 

Danube & U . S • S. R. 

Total 

OATS, EXPORTS : cj 

United States 

Canada 

Argentina 

Danube & U.S.S.R. 

Total 

CORN, EXPORTS: d/ 

United States . . . . 

Danube & U.S.S.R. 

Argentina 

South Africa 

Total 

United States 

— import s f . — 



it 



1,000 ' 1,000 ; 1,000 ; 1,000 
bushels, "an shela hush al.s bu&haXs 
9,886 5,153 ' 171 236 
6,883 13,880; : 
9,994' 14,668 3? 0 
. 41.090 26,313 1 If 75 


1 , 000 ; 

■Dushjsl-g 

r\ ' 

433.; 


Dec. 25 
Nov. 30 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 


1,000 ; 1,000. 

bn phf?1 f» hn dhe.l s 
3,933 7,018 
13,743 7,078 
4,154 800 

20,866 15,710 


67,852 65,016: 






42. 7011 . 30. 606 


1,423 912 24 45 
15, 615 10, 69Q j 
10,859 24,6CCi 275: 135 

1,390 940 o: n 


0 : 

( j : 


Dec. 25 
Nov. 30 
Jan . 1 
Jan* 1 


314 4,971 
6,377 3,79£ 
7,111 9,028 

800 1 60. 


.. 29,2*9 .37, 143 \ 






14.. fine! i 7,964 


• " ' '. 

\ 867' 432; 44i: 791 

14,321' 25,835| 0| 43 

297,387 401,722; 3,819! 2,662 
10.: 239: 145 1 397. P.j 539 


34 


Oct.lto 
Dec. 25 
Jan . 1 
J an . 1 

,Tnn . 1 


63: 791 

6,438: '-137 

110,257: 69,325 
• ^ RR7* ?.f)'95R_ 


322,314} 451 ,135* , : 






i pn 7ro: qn 71 1 











Compiled from offic: 
nearest to the date 
ginnin e Oc t o be r 1 . 



^1^^9^l03^i34-3- 



Sxoorts as far • • 

■i£L..reT)ortad, 

July 1. 1936-37, 1937-38 
to ■ b/ ■ b/ 



Oct.. 3]' 8 ] 1 22 1 /Iftffl 



al and trade sources, a/ The weeks shown in these columns are 
shown, b/ Preliminary, c/ Year be ginning July 1. d/ Year be- 



January 3, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



9 



ZXCH 


ANGE HATFS: 


Average 


weekly 


and mo 


r.thly v 


alues in New York of 




s 




encies. 


December 31, 


1337, v, 


l r h com 1 


■^arisen 


5 a/ 








Month ■ ! 


Week ended 


Country 


Monetary 


1935 


1336. 


1937 : 


1557 


Unit 


"NJOV , 


JlOV . 




Oct. J Nov. j 


Dec . : 


Dec. 














is ■ 


24 of- 


31 b/ 






uOn t S 




1 jc:. . G * 




_. . . T. :* . 


\jti^- ii S ; 


LrCi . Ii ™ 


O fVM 4* r~* 






'^9 P9 




o3.02 


33.03 


: 33.31: 


33.32 : 


33. 52 


J>5.iil 


Canada. ..... 


Dollar 


QP QO 




99 CjP ' 


100.02 


•100.07 j 


99.96 : 


- ^ . P Q 
v ^ . ^ *j 


33 . 86 


Chins 


Sha s . vuan . 


oq ad 




29. 66 ; 


29.45 


• 29.44; 


23.47 ; 


23.45 


29.45 


Deiimar : 


Krone ...... . 


21.93 


21.32 


22.11 , 


22.12 


: 22.301 


22.31 


22.31 


22.31 


i.i -i.'. jr- .CI . .... 


."ffi..Q.i ...... 


492.50 


488.80 


495. 30 : 


495.51 


•499.61 j 


499.71 


439.77 


439.71 


I'rance 


YVaT-C 


6.59 


4.65 


3.52' 


3.35 


'. 3. 39 


3.39 


3.4C 


3.39 


Germaiy 


F.eichsmar*. . . 


40.23 


40.22 


40.12 


40.15 


i 40.36: 


40.31 i 




40.28 


Ital;/ 


Lira 


3.10 


5.26 


5.26 


5.25 


i 5.26: 


5.25 : 


5. 26 


5.26 


Japan 


Yen 


23.63 


23.56 


28.87 


23 .85 


: 29 .09 ; 


23 ;09: 


23.08 


29.07 


Mexico 


peso 


27.77 


27.75 


27.75 


27.75 


; 27.75; 


27.75 • 


27.75 


27.75 


Netherlands. 


Guilder 


67.30 


53. 99 


55.15 


i 55.28 


1 55.45! 


55.51 • 


55.53 


55.62 


■orway 


Krone 


. 24.74 


24.56 


24. 38 


: 24.90 


; 25.10: 


25.11 


25.11 


' 25.11 


Sweden 


Krona 


25.39 


25.20 


2 c • «j «3 


; 25.55 


; 25.75; 


25.76' 


25.76 


' 25.76 


Switzerl and. 


Franc 


32.44 


22. 98 


22.37 


' 23.02 


23.15 : 


23.13 


23.13 


23.12 



Federal He serve Board, a/ Noon buying rates for cable transfers. 
Friday, due to holiday Saturday. 



oj weeic enaed 



17HZA-, IITCLODDJG FLOUR: Shipments from principal exporting countries, 
as giver, by current trade sources, 1935-36 to 1337-33 



aintry 



Total 

shipments 

>.>.jo ; jn 00- o < 



Shipments 1337, 
we ek ended 



id 



Dec. 25 



Shipments 
July 1 - Jan. 1 



1337 



North. America a/. 
Caiada, 

4 markets b/ . . 
United Stages d/ 

Argentina 

Australia 

U.S.S-H ' 

Danube and Bui gar 
3ritish India d/ 

Total fj 

Total Furopean 

shipments a/. • 
Total ex-Fur ope an 
— shJ^r^exiLs^Li 



• ♦ • < • 



ia ej . 



1,000 
bushels 
220,464 

245,133 
7,219 
73,312 
110,576 
23,024 
3, 312 
— 2,553 



360,254 



1,000 
bushels; 

194,531 
10,049 
154, 575 
105,335 

83 

65,544 



1,000 
bushel's 
4,155 

489 
2,339 
1,058 
2,063 
1,123 
176 
12-2 



1,000 



1 , 000 
m she Is 



4,783: 


3, 035 


866; 




1,282; 




1,906; 


1,110 


2,204'j 


3,172 


320"; 


0 


40 8 . 


438 


360 i 


1 F.0 



142,952 

153,179 
e/4,296 
35, 256 
56, 320 
38 

41,083 



1,000 
bushel s 

c/ 
58.783 

!c/34,729 
19,392 
38,472 
30,032 
24,912 
in 320 



434, 600 



151.750 127.13: 



155,438 

d 
63, 536 



el 

164, 653 

d 

38,848 



Compiled from official and trade sources, a/ Broomhall's Corn Trade yews, 
b/ Fort William, Fort Arthur, Vancouver, Prince Rupert, and Hew Westminister. 
cj Through December 25. d/ Official, ej Black -Sea shipments only, fj Total of 
trade figures includes North America as reoorted by Broomhall. d ^° December 11 



10 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 1 



I nde: 



age 



Late cables, 



Barley: 

Area, Scotland, 193 2-1937* • • 6' 

Production: 

Denmark, 1932-1937.,. 6 

England and Wales, 1932-1937... 6 

Scotland, 1932^1937 6 

Beans, production, Manchuria, 

1936,1937.'.. U 

Citrus f raits 1 exports, 

Egypt, 1936 ~\. '. k 

Corn, production, Manchuria, 

1936,1937;. ' U 

Flaxseed, area, India, 1936, 1937 •• • 1 
Kempseed, production, Manchuria, 

I936.I937... k 

Kaoliang, production,- Manchuria., 

1936,1937 ■ 

Millet, production, Manchuria, 

1036,1937 ^ 

Oats : 

Area, Scotland, 1932-1937 6 

Production: 

Denmark, 1932-1937 '6 

England and Wales, 1932-1937 . . . 6 

Scotland, 1932-1977 6 

Pears, monopoly fee reduction, 

Netherlands, Jan. 1, I938 5 

Perilla, production, Manchuria, 

1936,1937 ^ 

Potatoes, production, Denmark, 

1932-1937 6 

Rapeseed and mustard, area, 

India, 1976,1937 1 

Pice: 

Area, Siara, 1936,1937 1 



Page 

Rice, cont'd:- 
. Production: ... . .'■ .-. 

Manchuria, - 193 6 , 19^7 ^ 

Siam, 1936) 1937* •••• •• 1 

Rye : 

Prices, U.S., Jan. 1, 193^ S 

Production, .Denmark, I.932-I977. . 6 
Soybeans, production," Manchuria, 

1976,1977 ' ... . H 

Sugar "beets: 
Production: 

Denmark,' 1972-1977 . ... 6 

Germany,' 1976,1977 1 

Wheat : 

Area, Scotland, 1972-1937 ....... 6 

Exports, Japan,' - 

July-October 1937 3 

Imports: 

China (flour), November 1937.. 2 
Japan, October 1937 .......... » 3 

Marke t cpndi t i ons : 

China, Dec. 2U, 1937 2 

Japan, Dec. 1, 19 7 7«. 2 

Prices, specified markets, 

Dec. 31, 1937 7 

Production: 

Denmark, 1972-1937 6 

England and Wales, 1932-1937.- 6 

Manchuria, 1936,1977 

Scotland, 1932-1937 6 

Shipments, principal countries, 

Jan. 1, I93S../. 9 

Wool: 

Market conditions, U.K., 

"December 1937 •••• 5 

- Sal e s , Aus tral i a ( Sydney) , 

January- k, 197 S. .-. ; . . . 5